Klaviyo to Power BI

This page provides you with instructions on how to extract data from Klaviyo and analyze it in Power BI. (If the mechanics of extracting data from Klaviyo seem too complex or difficult to maintain, check out Stitch, which can do all the heavy lifting for you in just a few clicks.)

What is Klaviyo?

Klaviyo is an ecommerce marketing automation platform that lets organizations run data-driven email and Facebook campaigns.

What is Power BI?

Power BI is Microsoft’s business intelligence offering. It's a powerful platform that includes capabilities for data modeling, visualization, dashboarding, and collaboration. Many enterprises that use Microsoft's other products can get easy access to Power BI and choose it for its convenience, security, and power.

With high-value use cases across analysts, IT, business users, and developers, Power BI offers a comprehensive set of functionality that has consistently landed Microsoft in Gartner's "Leaders" quadrant for Business Intelligence.

Getting data out of Klaviyo

Klaviyo exposes data through several REST APIs, which developers can use to extract information on metrics, profiles, lists, campaigns, and templates. Each of these APIs has two to seven optional parameters you can use to refine the information returned. As an example, a simple call to retrieve data via the Klaviyo Metrics API would look like:

GET https://a.klaviyo.com/api/v1/metrics

The GET call returns a JSON object with all the fields of the specified dataset as a reply. All fields may not be present for any given record. The JSON might look like:

{
  "end": 1,
  "object": "$list",
  "page_size": 50,
  "start": 0,
  "total": 2,
  "data": [
    {
      "updated": "2017-11-03 17:28:09",
      "name": "Active on Site",
      "created": "2017-11-03 17:28:09",
      "object": "metric",
      "id": "3vtCwa",
      "integration": {
        "category": "API",
        "object": "integration",
        "id": "4qYGmQ",
        "name": "API"
      }
    },
    {
      "updated": "2017-11-03 20:54:40",
      "name": "Added integration",
      "created": "2017-11-03 20:54:40",
      "object": "metric",
      "id": "8qYK7L",
      "integration": {
        "category": "API",
        "object": "integration",
        "id": "4qYGmQ",
        "name": "API"
      }
    ]
  }

Loading data into Power BI

You can analyze any data in Power BI, as long as that data exists in a data warehouse that's connected to your Power BI account. The most common data warehouses include Amazon Redshift, Google BigQuery, and Snowflake. Microsoft also has its own data warehousing platform called Azure SQL Data Warehouse.

Connecting these data warehouses to Power BI is relatively simple. The Get Data menu in the Power BI interface allows you to import data from a number of sources, including static files and data warehouses. You'll find each of the warehouses mentioned above among the options in the Database list. The Power BI documentation provides more details on each.

Analyzing data in Power BI

In Power BI, each table in the data warehouse you connect is known as a dataset, and the analyses conducted on these datasets are known as reports. To create a report, use Power BI’s report editor, a visual interface for building and editing reports.

The report editor guides you through several selections in the course of building a report: the visualization type, fields being used in the report, filters being applied, any formatting you wish to apply, and additional analytics you may wish to layer onto your report, such as trendlines or averages. You can explore all of the features related to analyzing and tracking data in the Power BI documentation.

Once you've created a report, Power BI lets you share it with report "consumers" in your organization.

Keeping Klaviyo data up to date

At this point you've coded up a script or written a program to get the data you want and successfully moved it into your data warehouse. But how will you load new or updated data? It's not a good idea to replicate all of your data each time you have updated records. That process would be painfully slow and resource-intensive.

Instead, identify key fields that your script can use to bookmark its progression through the data and use to pick up where it left off as it looks for updated data. Auto-incrementing fields such as updated_at or created_at work best for this. When you've built in this functionality, you can set up your script as a cron job or continuous loop to get new data as it appears in Klaviyo.

And remember, as with any code, once you write it, you have to maintain it. If Klaviyo modifies its API, or the API sends a field with a datatype your code doesn't recognize, you may have to modify the script. If your users want slightly different information, you definitely will have to.

From Klaviyo to your data warehouse: An easier solution

As mentioned earlier, the best practice for analyzing Klaviyo data in Power BI is to store that data inside a data warehousing platform alongside data from your other databases and third-party sources. You can find instructions for doing these extractions for leading warehouses on our sister sites Klaviyo to Redshift, Klaviyo to BigQuery, and Klaviyo to Snowflake.

Easier yet, however, is using a solution that does all that work for you. Products like Stitch were built to solve this problem automatically. With just a few clicks, Stitch starts extracting your Klaviyo data via the API, structuring it in a way that is optimized for analysis, and inserting that data into a data warehouse that can be easily accessed and analyzed by Power BI.